Don’t miss the train

There was one train that stopped in Broken Hill, Australia and it only came a few days a week. I missed it and I was crying to the ticket agent while she was giving me options I couldn’t afford on my backpacker’s budget. I was in the middle of Australia’s outback and I guess I was going to be staying for another day or two. At the time it seemed like a horrible day, but these are the things that can happen while traveling.

To be fair, this was my fault. I arrived at the train station on time and waited for nearly an hour. There was an announcement over the speakers saying the already late train was broken down and they believed it would be an hour until it arrived at the station. It was early morning in Broken Hill, so I left to get a cup of coffee a few blocks away. While at a cute cafe I hadn’t visited during my time there I looked over the menu and ordered a small breakfast. I waited with my coffee for my carryout order to be ready and boxed up. It took a total of fifteen minutes and I started back to the station. I heard train noises coming from the station. I went running with my not very light backpack, coffee and bag of freshly cooked food to the Broken Hill train station a few short blocks away just in time to run up the flight of stair to see the last of the train pulling away. I yelled out and began to cry, a reaction I do not normally have when things turn upside-down on me. The ticket attendant tried to comfort me and give me options to get out of this lonely outback town. These options included buying another ticket leaving a few days later or getting a taxi to drive to the next town the train was stopping at and asking the train conductor to wait. The cab ride would be cutting it very close and the train would only be able to wait about fifteen minutes. I did not have money to pay a taxi to speed to the next stop a few hours away. I was also not able to get my money back from the train I had just watch leave without me. Still very upset and felling defeated I left the train station and walked down the road still with hot breakfast in hand. I Found a parking lot with a space for me to sit unnoticed under a ramp and called my mom. She did what all great mothers do and told me it was going to be all right and there were other options for me. I knew this to be true, but I was just so mad at myself. I let my mother talk softly to me as I ate my delicious breakfast still sniffling. With my head hanging low I went back to the small hotel I had just checked out of and explained my situation and asked for another night. The owner was so kind to let me go back to the same room which wasn’t yet made up.

I did make plans to leave and I was only delayed a single day. I caught a bus very early the next morning and said goodbye to Broken Hill once again and watched out the bus window a beautiful outback sunrise as the bus drove down Barrier Highway back towards Sydney.

The art of coffee in New Zealand

Although there are Starbucks close to everywhere New Zealand does coffee slower and much better. Like a lot of things in the country, Kiwis take pride in their coffee making. There are a few distinct differences when ordering coffee in New Zealand (and Australia). The two big differences are the flat white and the tall black. There are many other types of coffee available when you walk up the the counter. The barrister takes pride in the art of coffee in New Zealand. Every coffee is started with fresh roasted grounds perfectly pressed into an espresso machine. Drip coffee pots are very hard to find.  If you enjoy coffee then drinking four hour old coffee may not be your idea of a good coffee. Every coffee is made to order and is worth the wait and the line to get your morning coffee. It is not only in coffee shops and restaurants that this bean art is taken so seriously, gas station also follow suit with a coffee bar with someone there to make it. There is no stale coffee in pots or urns. So you better know what you want as you walk up and dont just say “I want a large coffee” because you will get a strange look. Most coffee is espresso based in many varieties.  You can get a large, not so strong cup of coffee called the Americano which is a espresso diluted with water. Short black, long black, short macchiato, americano, long macchiato, flat white, latte, cappuccino, mochaccino, piccolo, affogato, and vienna are all common espresso drinks you can find and should try. But the drink of the Kiwis is the flat white and its easy to see why. The flat white is 1/3 espresso and 2/3 steamed milk with mineral foam. It is still up for debate where this drink originated from . Both Australia and New Zealand both lay claim to starting this drink. It is a common and heated topic at times because both countries are very passionate about the coffee art.

  • Flat white• starts with a double espresso with steamed milk and foam. The difference between a flat white and an
  • Tall black • no milk, no sugar just great coffee, and strong

Coffee art is very trendy lately and New Zealand is no stranger to the beautiful creations made atop your coffee. As see above my cup of flat white has a little bird and a fern, a symbol of the country. The barista make it look so effortless as they dump the steaming coffee and creamy foam into a mug. But the most important this is the taste. The flat white is where the pride and the art comes in. It is much harder to make a pretty picture on top of a tall black. If you love coffee then try the local favorite of the area you are in. Go out of your comfort zone and try new things, you may never go back to drip coffee again.

Salamanca Market

Tucked away at the edge of town in Hobart is a lively street market. Early in the morning when the row on sandstone buildings have an orange glow, vendors are busy setting up for this large outdoor market. I cut through a park to head to the market and before I made it to the other side I was following my nose right to the fresh baked and fried delights that awaited. There were street performers playing for tips and vendors shouting out to potential buyers walking by. There are two main rows of the market headed down many blocks and including the local shops lining the road enticing market-goers to come inside. The entire scene is loud and colorful making me turn my head trying not to miss any sights. The people of Hobart are craft people making homemade items from scented oils children’s toys. Fresh cut flowers and all sorts of food make while you watch and wait.

I started down one row and was sure to stay on one side and try to only look at only that side all the way to the end and turned around and did the same to the other side of the side aisle to make sure I didn’t miss anything. There are two long and wide rows which I make sure I double back a few parts to make my final purchases and head out to the water for a break from the shoulder to shoulder people at the Salamanca Market. I had an amazing sausage roll with all the fixings and a flat white coffee as I sat and watched the hustle of the market from afar.

The Salamanca Market has been selling wares from 1972 in Tasmania every Saturday. It’s one of the most visited tourist attractions on the entire island of Tasmania. It’s free and it’s in the central part of Hobart how could it not be the most popular! Make sure you get up early on Saturday in Hobart tucked away in Tasmania. You won’t be sorry.

There is also more of a local market on Sunday morning in town. Consisting of cheese and dried meats tents, but mainly fruits and vegetables with a few food trucks. On Sunday I went out to the market to do some shopping it went from raining to pouring on my short walk down the hill to the closed-off road. I already walked these blocked a few hours before that morning and watched the vendors transfer their produce carefully from the car and trucks to the displays and not a drop fell. The whole morning it rained but that didn’t seem to dampen the buyers or sellers in Hobart. The slow precision of the umbrella looking over the goods stopped at the food trucks. The food trucks brought warmth and a lifeline through the rain. A few large tents in the center of the horseshoe for eating was a close cluster with no umbrellas. I had a great lunch in the rain with a few laughs under the tents. Just because it’s raining doesn’t mean the world is inside, go outside and splash in the world.

Manly Island

Going to manly Island on the Ferry is a slow peaceful way to some other parts of Sydney and great photo ops on the way of the iconic Sydney Opera House and the Sydney Harbor Bridge. There are sailboats scattered all along the waterways and speedboats zipping by.

Getting off the ferry I was surrounded by small tourist shops selling food and beachwear. The boardwalk leads right out from the shops to the long stretch of golden sand beaches. Manly Island is a great Sydney surf spot and on a sunny day, there is competition for the good sets of waves. When I walked down the path along the beach there were two beach volleyball courts set up with bleaches on the beach for events. At the end of the path are an ocean pool and a health center with an amazing view.

Melbourne, Australia Chinatown vibes

The Chinatown in Melbourne Australia in the central business district and is home to places of business, worships, and restaurants for the home of the longest continuous Chinese settlement. The Chinese originally came for the Australian gold rush and stayed for a new life. This small section of Melbourne is home to the Chinese’s New Year festival which lasts for a few weeks every year with fireworks and the waking of the dragon.

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Many people just pass by  Little Bourke Street on their hustle of the madness of the downtown. I can not say enough how amazing getting away from the droves of people can be. The hidden discovers to be found. Chinatown is missed often because there is so much to do in Melbourne. You can walk down the gate that is the start of Chinatown and see many different Asian restaurants and shops.  Chinatown has grown from one block with a gate on each end to now have grown to multiple blocks over the past few years. I learned that in American Chinatowns, there are mostly Cantonese settled there. In Melbourne, there is a much more diverse Chinatown represented. Why is that good for you? Many more types of food to try and more mixing of cultures.

When you make it to the busy area of CBD of Melbourne make sure you take time out to walk the few blocks of Chinatown. Even if it is just to see the beautiful buildings and for the free smells.

A first look at Melbourne Australia

Vegemite yuck!

Vegemite is the yucky, think, salty spread made from leftover brewers; yeast. It was made by Cyrill Callister in Melbourne, Australia in 1922 and the locals still love it today. For me, there isn’t much love for Vegemite even if it does have Vitamin B in it. Waking up to a free breakfast is one of traveling’s perks, but seeing five gallons of brown mush waiting at the table I know my options are limited. Like any good travler, I always try new things even if it’s just once and can write a blog post about how much I don’t care for it. To each their own.

Sun or rain in Sydney

Big city Sydney is always photogenic. I came and went through Sydney multiple times and was never sick of the city and always found places to explore.

I started most of my days at the Central train station shown above. A perfect hub to be staying with plenty of stores and shops. By “shops and stores” I really mean I found a corner store, a mini grocery store, a liquor store I couldn’t afford, a liquor store I could afford, and a mini-mall a short walk with many restaurants local and corporate along the way.

A few short train stops you land in the tourist-rich circular quay. Before you even step off the train you can see the opera house and harbor bridge before even taking a step off the train. I must say my first time coming up the track seeing the grand Sydney Opera House I was super excited and standing in awe looking out the window waiting for the train to stop.

Even on an overcast day the Sydney Opera House still stands gloriously against its bleak background.

Tasmania

This amazing place is somewhere I never planned to go and didn’t know much about it until I started planning it from Canberra. There is a lot more to see and do despite the small size the island of Tasmania is especially sitting next to Australia. I started my trip from Melbourne to Hobart. It was a short flight and uneventful until the flight landed and we deplaned and waited for the baggage. Being from America I have seen dogs in airports and think nothing of it. Just another part of security. Something I have never seen before is the dogs walking on the luggage belt sniffing and checking every bag coming out from the incoming flights,. I have only seen the security dogs sitting at checkpoints at airports, I have never seen dogs running on the belt before or after in any of the 35 countries I have traveled to. I’m not sure if it is such a small airport that they have the manpower or really the dog power to do this kind of security check. I do not smuggle drugs or whatever else people try to get in other countries so I was on my way after I picked up my pack and headed out to find a bus that I didn’t bother booking beforehand. The door slid open and I walked out to a beautiful sunset with a good first impression of Tasmania.

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I tool a small airport shuttle bus stopping at every hotel and bed and breakfast on a set route. Fall was upon the regain and my thinned out Florida blood was very cold in the mornings and nights. Like a lizard, I tried to stay in the sun. The city center was about fifteen minutes from the airport. By the times we make our twists and turnarounds with the drop-offs it took another twenty to thirty minutes to get to my hostel.  The next morning I started off before the sun to catch the sunrise at the docks. A brisk fifteen-minute walk as I watched the world wake up on the way.

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